The Deaths of Terri Shiavo and Pope John Paul II

The deaths of Terri Shiavo and Pope John Paul II have dominated our news over the past two weeks. What are we to make of these two events as we think outside the box of organized religion?

Later this week Brad and Wayne will be taping their third edition of The God Journey and will be examining these two events and what they tell us about Christianity in the 21st century.

We have now opened up four channels for people to participate with us in the conversation, sending in their comments or questions before we begin. Our favorite is a Voice line where you can record your questions or comments for play on the webcast. To find out how you can participate with us, please see The God Journey Blog. We’d love to know what some of you are thinking about these events.

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2 Comments
  1. J April 4, 2005 at 11:23 pm

    I am responding to the death of the pope. I sit in wonder at the coverage and adoration of this man. I am not sitting in judgement over whether or not he was a good man. I am just amazed at the pedestal that he was put, or chose to be put on. It seems like at least some or many of the people mourning him are so saddened because they perhaps worshipped him in some way.

    However, this happens in many Christian meeting places and lives everyday, regardless of the denomination they wish to call themselves. It is sad. Are we worshipping the pope, our priests, our pastors, our favorite television evangelists, our favorite Christian writer, our favorite Christian musicians, or even ourselves, or are we worshipping the one true God, the Alpha and Omega, the Lord of Lords, and the Prince of Peace Jesus Christ our one and only Savior?

    I think part of the problem is that people like to be able to point to others and say that person is a good representative of Christ. That seems to make it easier on ourselves. Notice that when you point your finger, there are three other fingers pointing right back at yourself. The question should not be whether or not others are good representatives of Christ, but a better and more important question should be, "Am I a good representative of Christ?" I have to be honest, many times I am not. I know that I must sincerely seek God and through that, I will be a better representative of Him. Before we do anything else, let’s first search within ourselves because this question demands an answer.

  2. J April 5, 2005 at 2:23 am

    I am responding to the death of the pope. I sit in wonder at the coverage and adoration of this man. I am not sitting in judgement over whether or not he was a good man. I am just amazed at the pedestal that he was put, or chose to be put on. It seems like at least some or many of the people mourning him are so saddened because they perhaps worshipped him in some way.

    However, this happens in many Christian meeting places and lives everyday, regardless of the denomination they wish to call themselves. It is sad. Are we worshipping the pope, our priests, our pastors, our favorite television evangelists, our favorite Christian writer, our favorite Christian musicians, or even ourselves, or are we worshipping the one true God, the Alpha and Omega, the Lord of Lords, and the Prince of Peace Jesus Christ our one and only Savior?

    I think part of the problem is that people like to be able to point to others and say that person is a good representative of Christ. That seems to make it easier on ourselves. Notice that when you point your finger, there are three other fingers pointing right back at yourself. The question should not be whether or not others are good representatives of Christ, but a better and more important question should be, "Am I a good representative of Christ?" I have to be honest, many times I am not. I know that I must sincerely seek God and through that, I will be a better representative of Him. Before we do anything else, let’s first search within ourselves because this question demands an answer.

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