Living Loved with a Little Help from Merton

“Living loved” has become quite the motto around here. It’s what allows us to live deeply in the life of Jesus. Recently a correspondent sent me some excerpts on that theme drawn from Thomas Merton’s book, No Man Is An Island. Since I have had time to write anything this week, I thought you’d enjoy his take on this. I sure did. His words vibrate with truth and life!

13. Our ability to be sincere with ourselves, with God, and with other men is really proportionate to our capacity for sincere love. And the sincerity of our love depends in large measure upon our capacity to believe ourselves loved. Most of the moral and mental and even religious complexities of our time go back to our desperate fear that we are not and can never be really loved by anyone.

When we consider that most men want to be loved as if they were gods, it is hardly surprising that they should despair of receiving the love they think they deserve. Even the biggest of fools must be dimly aware that he is not worthy of adoration, and no matter what he may believe about his right to be adored, he will not be long in finding out that he can never fool anyone enough to make her adore him. And yet our idea of ourselves is so fantastically unreal that we rebel against this lack of “love” as though we were the vic¬tims of an injustice. Our whole life is then constructed on a basis of duplicity. We assume that others are re¬ceiving the kind of appreciation we want for ourselves, and we proceed on the assumption that since we are not lovable as we are, we must become lovable under false pretenses, as if we were something better than we are. The real reason why so few men believe in God is that they have ceased to believe that even a God can love them. But their despair is, perhaps, more respect¬able than the insincerity of those who think they can trick God into loving them for something they are not. This kind of duplicity is, after all, fairly common among so-called “believers,” who consciously cling to the hope that God Himself, placated by prayer, will support their egotism and their insincerity, and help them to achieve their own selfish ends.

14. If we are to love sincerely, and with simplicity, we must first of all overcome the fear of not being loved. And this cannot be done by forcing ourselves to believe in some illusion, saying that we are loved when we are not. We must somehow strip ourselves of our great¬est illusions about ourselves, frankly recognize in how many ways we are unlovable, descend into the depths of our being until we come to the basic reality that is in us, and learn to see that we are lovable after all, in spite of everything! This is a difficult job. It can only really be done by a lifetime of genuine humility. We must accept the fact that we are not what we would like to be. We must cast off our false, exterior self like the cheap and showy garment that it is. We must find our real self, in all its elemental poverty but also in its very great and very simple dignity: created to be a child of God, and capable of loving with some¬thing of God’s own sincerity and His unselfishness.

The first step in this sincerity is the recognition that although we are worth little or nothing in ourselves, we are potentially worth very much, because we can hope to be loved by God. He does not love us because we are good, but we become good when and because He loves us. If we receive this love in all simplicity, the sincerity of our love for others will more or less take care of it¬self. Strong in the confidence that we are loved by Him, we will not worry too much about the uncertainty of being loved by other men. I do not mean that we will be indifferent to their love for us: since we wish them to love in us the God Who loves them in us. But we will never have to be anxious about their love, which in any case we do not expect to see too dearly in this life.

15. The whole question of sincerity, then, is basically a question of love and fear. The man who is selfish, nar¬row, who loves little and fears much that he will not be loved, can never be deeply sincere, even though he may sometimes have a character that seems to be frank on the surface. In his depths he will always be involved in duplicity. He will deceive himself in his best and most serious intentions. Nothing he says or feels about love, whether human or divine, can safely be believed, until his love be purged at least of its basest and most unreasonable fears.

But the man who is not afraid to admit everything that he sees to be wrong with himself, and yet recognizes that he may be the object of God’s love precisely because of his shortcomings, can begin to be sincere. His sincerity is based on confidence, not in his illusions about himself, but in the endless, unfailing mercy of God.

Perhaps letting God teach us how to live loved is the hardest thing we’ll ever learn. Our flesh wars against it, and religion constantly challenges the notion by making us think that God only loves us when we’ve earned it some how. But he has always loved you, and always will. That doesn’t change. Whether you believe it or not, makes all the difference in the world. This is where transformation begins!

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14 Comments
  1. kent January 30, 2009 at 2:12 pm

    And what a wonderful transformation it is.

  2. Melbourne Sue January 30, 2009 at 4:44 pm

    Yes, it’s good watching your ongoing transformation, Kentster 🙂

    Thanks for posting these words, Wayne. I don’t feel like I need to eat breakfast now 🙂

  3. kent January 30, 2009 at 5:12 pm

    And what a wonderful transformation it is.

  4. Melbourne Sue January 30, 2009 at 7:44 pm

    Yes, it’s good watching your ongoing transformation, Kentster 🙂

    Thanks for posting these words, Wayne. I don’t feel like I need to eat breakfast now 🙂

  5. larry January 31, 2009 at 2:43 am

    I feel like I need to understand more words like this rather than the sermon last week regarding a dog returning to its vomit. Just when I get the feeling that I understand these truths… this precious knowledge of God, it seems that old habits creep in to steal the joy.
    Thanks for the post!

  6. larry January 31, 2009 at 5:43 am

    I feel like I need to understand more words like this rather than the sermon last week regarding a dog returning to its vomit. Just when I get the feeling that I understand these truths… this precious knowledge of God, it seems that old habits creep in to steal the joy.
    Thanks for the post!

  7. Angela January 31, 2009 at 8:52 pm

    Thanks, Wayne, for sharing that. I needed the reminder. 🙂

  8. Angela January 31, 2009 at 11:52 pm

    Thanks, Wayne, for sharing that. I needed the reminder. 🙂

  9. Sandy Sandlin February 4, 2009 at 5:02 am

    Just started this journed of living loved last week. It is like starting all over–LOL
    If you are ever in the Dallas, TX area, let us know.
    God Bless
    Sandy & Paula

  10. Sandy Sandlin February 4, 2009 at 8:02 am

    Just started this journed of living loved last week. It is like starting all over–LOL
    If you are ever in the Dallas, TX area, let us know.
    God Bless
    Sandy & Paula

  11. Tom (aka Volkmar) February 8, 2009 at 7:42 pm

    That dead Cistercian (who liked cheeseburgers, beer, and hanging out with folks like Joan Baez) had a thorough going experience of God’s love and was able to articulate that radical love of God from within the confines of a religiously ridgid institution.

    Tom

  12. Tom (aka Volkmar) February 8, 2009 at 10:42 pm

    That dead Cistercian (who liked cheeseburgers, beer, and hanging out with folks like Joan Baez) had a thorough going experience of God’s love and was able to articulate that radical love of God from within the confines of a religiously ridgid institution.

    Tom

  13. Janelle March 10, 2009 at 3:12 pm

    I have been devouring all the “wonderful words, words of life and beauty” on your blog, also Mr. Young’s. God bless you so much! I have never heard anyone speak like you do except my own precious father, who got to go to Papa four years ago. You can imagine the balm it is to hear all you share. I just want ot say here, the more I ponder living loved, the more I see it covers all bases! It is a whole new world, as George MacDonald says, a whole different “orbit”.
    I know you won’t mind, I copied this post on my blog. Thank you!

  14. Janelle March 10, 2009 at 6:12 pm

    I have been devouring all the “wonderful words, words of life and beauty” on your blog, also Mr. Young’s. God bless you so much! I have never heard anyone speak like you do except my own precious father, who got to go to Papa four years ago. You can imagine the balm it is to hear all you share. I just want ot say here, the more I ponder living loved, the more I see it covers all bases! It is a whole new world, as George MacDonald says, a whole different “orbit”.
    I know you won’t mind, I copied this post on my blog. Thank you!

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